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KF4743.5 1792 "Congress of the United States: begun and held at the city of New-York, on Wednesday the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine. The conventions of a number of the states having at the time of their adopting the Constitution expressed a desire ... that further declaratory and restrictive clauses should be added ... Resolved ... that the following articles be proposed to the legislatures of the several states, as amendments to the Constitution ..."
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United States. 1st Cong., 3d sess., 1790-1791.

Congress of the United States: begun and held at the city of New-York, on Wednesday the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine. The conventions of a number of the states having at the time of their adopting the Constitution expressed a desire ... that further declaratory and restrictive clauses should be added ... Resolved ...that the following articles be proposed to the legislatures of the several states, as amendments to the Constitution ... [Philadelphia: Printed by Childs and Swaine, 1792]

For imprint see R. P. Bristol, Supplement to Charles Evans' American bibliography (1970), B8177.

Contains the texts of 12 proposed amendments, of which 10 were ratified Dec. 15, 1791 as the "Bill of Rights," together with the texts of the ratifications by the states, 1789-1791. 11p. 34cm.

On September 25, 1789, Congress proposed twelve articles to amend the Constitution. On December 15, 1791, articles 3-12 were ratified by Virginia, giving the three-fourths majority required. Articles 3-12 then became the first ten amendments to the Constitution, known as the Bill of Rights. On March 1, 1792, Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State, sent the first printing of the amendments to governors of the states to provide the with the official text. (The amendments had been published previously as proposals.) This declaration of the rights of man has influenced other documents such as the French constitution of 1946 and the United Nations Charter. Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Georgia did not ratify the Bill of Rights until 1939.



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